Which plants like coffee grounds?

coffee as fertilizer

Coffee grounds are a great addition to the garden, as they can provide a number of benefits to plants.

Many plants, particularly those that thrive in acidic soil, are known to benefit from the addition of coffee grounds to their growing medium. Here are a few examples of plants that are known to like coffee grounds:

Blueberries

Blueberries are a popular plant for coffee grounds, as they prefer acidic soil with a pH between 4.5 and 5.5.

Coffee grounds can help lower the pH of the soil, making it more acidic and suitable for blueberries. Simply blend coffee grounds into the soil around your blueberry plants, or spread them over the surface as mulch.

Rhododendrons and Azaleas

Like blueberries, rhododendrons and azaleas prefer acidic soil with a pH between 4.5 and 5.5. Coffee grounds can help lower soil pH, making it more suitable for these plants.

Mix coffee grounds into the soil around your rhododendrons and azaleas, or use them as a mulch to help retain water and stop weeds.


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Tomatoes

Tomatoes are another plant that can benefit from the addition of coffee grounds to their soil.

Coffee grounds can help to improve the soil structure and provide a source of nutrients for the plants. To use coffee grounds for tomatoes, mix them into the soil around the plants, or use them as a mulch to help retain moisture and suppress weeds.

Rose Bushes

Coffee grounds can also be beneficial for rose bushes, as they can help to deter pests and improve the soil structure.

Citrus Trees

Citrus trees, such as oranges and lemons, also prefer acidic soil with a pH between 6.0 and 6.5. Coffee grounds can help lower soil pH, making it more suitable for these plants.

In addition to these plants, coffee grounds can also be beneficial for other acid-loving plants such as camellias, hydrangeas, and ferns.

When using coffee grounds in the garden, it is essential to remember that they are high in nitrogen and can lead to an excess of this nutrient if overused.

To prevent this, mix coffee grounds with other organic matter such as compost or leaf mulch, and use them sparingly around your plants.

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